“Keep your Small Business opinions on religion, race, politics and everything else to yourself” was a reply to ‘what one-sentence advice would you give to someone starting a business?’

Interesting to see people’s perspectives on this question. This answer I could not agree with, and here is why.

The topics are controversial, can open up cans of worms, and trigger people’s reactions, but that doesn’t mean we need to avoid them altogether. It comes down to your brand and your brand voice.

For instance, if you start a business selling Christian t-shirts, you need to talk about religion. It would make no sense otherwise. So let’s park that example.

Did you have a strong opinion on gay marriage or black lives matter? Different businesses reacted differently, from head in the sand, to deliberate silence, to shouting out their stance openly.

If your business has strong opinions about a topic, then it’s okay to tell people. Ben & Jerry’s, for instance, made a stand about gay marriage. An ice-cream business, it had nothing to do with them. However, it was a cause they believed in strongly, and they used it to build connections with those who agreed and were not afraid to repel those who didn’t. “Our commitment to the LGBTQ community is grounded in our company’s core values, which include a deep respect for people inside and outside our company, and an unshakable belief that all people deserve full and equal civil rights.” https://www.benandjerry.com.au/whats-new/equality-for-all.

Having an opinion does not mean we need to be nasty. We should always be kind and polite. What do you stand up for and represent in your business?

Jane Tweedy 0490 102 194 Western Sydney Business Centre [email protected]

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Should A Small Business Express its Opinions?