By Miranda – Practice Manager at Round Corner Dental

A study in Europe of the effects of lockdowns on dietary habits was published in April of this year before the current restrictions in Australia took hold.

Over a third of the examined population in the study showed a significant increase in snacking and alcohol consumption.

I can say for certain my desk-fridge-desk movements in the last few months reflect this data, my pantry and I share an intimate understanding.

At the surgery, we have a communal cupboard where I hide my snacks, along with a snack bounty that I have thieved from unsuspecting staff members.

As our restricted Covid hours have kept me home more than a few days a week, I now find myself unable to concentrate on simple tasks, tortured by thoughts of decadent caramel slices, sugar-coated apricot bites, chocolate muffins laced with cinnamon…

It’s just so easy to fall into the sugar trap! Even without the perils of lockdown, the average Australian consumes around 14 teaspoons of sugar per day.

The World Health Organisation’s recommended maximum is only 6!

With teeth and sugar, frequency does the most damage. In other words, it’s much worse to snack on sugary foods throughout the day rather than consume one big sugary dessert after dinner. The longer our teeth are exposed to those nasty acids, the higher the chance of decay.

Anything sticky and chewy is the worst!

There are a few ways to reduce the risk of damage. Try to avoid grazing by setting and sticking to a meal routine.

Be selective with snacks, too; protein is your friend as it keeps you fuller for longer – veggies, lean meats and cheese are great for this. Drink plenty of water to help neutralise acids and rinse away lingering food.

Finally, don’t be deceived by fresh fruit – the high sugar content means too much can be harmful. Two servings per day are enough!

We’re looking forward to catching up with all our patients when restrictions ease, and we can provide routine services again. Until then, stay safe!

Fridge